THE SURRENDER

The Surrender is a memoir by Toni Bentley published in 2012. It chronicles her sexcapades with an un-named man. Bentley’s memoir is provocative and erotic, and it is unusual enough to be highly memorable.  Ultimately it is more style than substance, not just in what it has to say about anal sex, but also in its depiction of relationships.  Bentley herself, despite revealing such intimate details about her life, seems an alien personality.  We don’t learn anything about her friendships or family from the book, or anything about her work, and we learn very little about her, except for her sex life.  Even more troubling, she doesn’t leave her readers wanting to know more about her.  It is as if she has anticipated that, having told her readers so much about her anal predilections, they won’t want to know learn more about the rest of her life, and she is shutting herself off.

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MADAME BOVARY

Madame Bovary is the debut novel of French writer Gustave Flaubert, published in 1856. The story focuses on a doctor’s wife, Emma Bovary, who has adulterous affairs and lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life.
The book was in some ways inspired by the life of a schoolfriend of the author who became a doctor. Flaubert’s friend and mentor, Louis Bouilhet, had suggested to him that this might be a suitably “down-to earth” subject for a novel and that Flaubert should attempt to write in a “natural way,” without digressions.Indeed, the writing style was of supreme importance to Flaubert. 

While writing the novel, he wrote that it would be “a book about nothing, a book dependent on nothing external, which would be held together by the internal strength of its style,” an aim which, for the critic Jean Rousset, made Flaubert “the first in date of the non-figurative novelists,” such as James Joyce and Virginia Woolf. Though Flaubert avowed no liking for the style of Balzac, the novel he produced became arguably a prime example and an enhancement of literary realism in the vein of Balzac. The “realism” in the novel was to prove an important element in the trial for obscenity: the lead prosecutor argued that not only was the novel immoral, but that realism in literature was also an offence against art and decency

PLOT

Madame Bovary takes place in provincial northern France, near the town of Rouen in Normandy. Charles Bovary is a shy, oddly dressed teenager arriving at a new school where his new classmates ridicule him. Charles struggles his way to a second-rate medical degree and becomes an officier de santé (fr) in the Public Health Service. He marries the woman his mother has chosen for him, the unpleasant but supposedly rich widow Heloise Dubuc. He sets out to build a practice in the village of Tostes (now Tôtes).
One day, Charles visits a local farm to set the owner’s broken leg and meets his patient’s daughter, Emma Rouault. Emma is a beautiful, daintily dressed young woman who has received a “good education” in a convent. She has a powerful yearning for luxury and romance inspired by reading popular novels. Charles is immediately attracted to her, and visits his patient far more often than necessary, until Heloise’s jealousy puts a stop to the visits.
When Heloise unexpectedly dies, Charles waits a decent interval before courting Emma in earnest. Her father gives his consent, and Emma and Charles marry.
The novel’s focus shifts to Emma. Charles means well but is plodding and clumsy. After he and Emma attend an elegant ball given by the Marquis d’Andervilliers, Emma finds her married life dull and becomes listless. Charles decides his wife needs a change of scenery and moves his practice to the larger market town of Yonville (traditionally identified with the town of Ry). There, Emma gives birth to a daughter, Berthe, but motherhood proves a disappointment to Emma. She becomes infatuated with an intelligent young man she meets in Yonville, a young law student, Léon Dupuis, who shares her appreciation for literature and music and returns her esteem. Concerned with maintaining her self-image as a devoted wife and mother, Emma does not acknowledge her passion for Léon and conceals her contempt for Charles, drawing comfort from the thought of her virtue. Léon despairs of gaining Emma’s affection and departs to study in Paris.
One day, a rich and rakish landowner, Rodolphe Boulanger, brings a servant to the doctor’s office to be bled. He casts his eye over Emma and imagines she will be easily seduced. He invites her to go riding with him for the sake of her health. Charles, solicitous for his wife’s health and not at all suspicious, embraces the plan. Emma and Rodolphe begin an affair. She, consumed by her romantic fantasy, risks compromising herself with indiscreet letters and visits to her lover. After four years, she insists they run away together. Rodolphe does not share her enthusiasm for this plan and on the eve of their planned departure, he ends the relationship with an apologetic, self-effacing letter placed at the bottom of a basket of apricots he has delivered to Emma. The shock is so great that Emma falls deathly ill and briefly turns to religion.
When Emma is nearly fully recovered, she and Charles attend the opera, at Charles’ insistence, in nearby Rouen. The opera reawakens Emma’s passions, and she encounters Léon who, now educated and working in Rouen, is also attending the opera. They begin an affair. While Charles believes that she is taking piano lessons, Emma travels to the city each week to meet Léon, always in the same room of the same hotel, which the two come to view as their home. The love affair is ecstatic at first, but Léon grows bored with Emma’s emotional excesses, and Emma grows ambivalent about Léon. Emma indulges her fancy for luxury goods with purchases made on credit from the crafty merchant Lheureux, who arranges for her to obtain power of attorney over Charles’ estate. Emma’s debt steadily mounts.
When Lheureux calls in Bovary’s debt, Emma pleads for money from several people, including Léon and Rodolphe, only to be turned down. In despair, she swallows arsenic and dies an agonizing death. Charles, heartbroken, abandons himself to grief, preserves Emma’s room as a shrine, and adopts her attitudes and tastes to keep her memory alive. In his last months, he stops working and lives by selling off his possessions. His remaining possessions are seized to pay off Lheureux. When he finds Rodolphe and Léon’s love letters, he breaks down for good. He dies, and his young daughter Berthe is placed with her grandmother, who soon dies. Berthe then lives with an impoverished aunt, who sends her to work in a cotton mill. The book concludes with the local pharmacist Homais, who had competed with Charles’s medical practice, gaining prominence among Yonville people and being awarded for his medical achievements.

Download the book: Madame Bovary.pdf

ROMANCE OF LUST (A CLASSIC VICTORIAN EROTICA)

The Romance of Lust, or Early Experiences is a Victorian erotic novel written anonymously in four volumes during the years 1873–1876 and published by William Lazenby.
The novel is told in first person, and the protagonist of the novel is Charlie Roberts. Charlie possesses a large penis, much virility, and a seemingly insatiable sexual appetite. The novel begins with “There were three of us — Mary, Eliza, and myself.” Charlie describes his sexual initiation as an adolescent — as he is “approaching fifteen”.
He catalogs his sexual experiences including incest with his sisters Eliza and Mary, sex with his governesses, and his later sexual exploits with various male and female friends, and acquaintances. Besides incest, the book deals with a variety of sexual activities, including orgies, masturbation, lesbianism, flagellation, fellatio, cunnilingus, gay sex, anal sex, and double penetration. Taboo subjects such as homosexuality, incest, and pedophilia are common themes in the novel.

Note: ‘I advise you only read this if you are 18+ and very open-minded. The book contains strong language and very sexual acts. Altogether, it is a reasonable read. The anonymity adds to the thrill.’


Download the book: The Romance Of Lust.pdf

FIFTY SHADES OF GREY SERIES (TRILOGY)

book-coverFifty Shades of Grey is a 2011 erotic romance novel by British author E. L. James. It is the first installment in the Fifty Shades trilogy that traces the deepening relationship between a college graduate, Anastasia Steele, and a young business magnate, Christian Grey. It is notable for its explicitly erotic scenes featuring elements of sexual practices involving bondage/discipline, dominance/submission, and sadism/masochism (BDSM).

PLOT

Anastasia “Ana” Steele is a 21-year-old college senior attending Washington State University in Vancouver, Washington. Her best friend is Katherine “Kate” Kavanagh, who writes for the college newspaper. Due to an illness, Kate is unable to interview 27-year-old Christian Grey, a successful and wealthy Seattle entrepreneur, and asks Ana to take her place. Ana finds Christian attractive as well as intimidating. As a result, she stumbles through the interview and leaves Christian’s office believing it went poorly. Ana does not expect to meet Christian again, but he appears at the hardware store where she works. While he purchases various items including cable ties, masking tape, and rope, Ana informs Christian that Kate would like some photographs to illustrate her article about him. Christian gives Ana his phone number. Later, Kate urges Ana to call Christian and arrange a photo shoot with their photographer friend, José Rodriguez.

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